#SproutChat: Social Media Listening vs Monitoring

sprout

My recap of the 3/1/2017 #SproutChat hosted by @sprout_sarah  & @SproutSocial   Join the conversation every Wednesday at 3pm EST.

Q1: What’s the difference between social listening and monitoring?

  • Social Listening leads to engagement – monitoring is simply seeing what is out there
  • Social monitoring can lead to trouble: why are ppl taking about my brand this way? Engage and find out
  • Social Listening will help you improve your product, service, and customer trust
  • No matter listening or monitoring – you should wonder why ppl are going to 3rd party places rather than talking to you

Q2: Why is it important to go beyond just monitoring brand mentions and responding reactively?

  • Responding builds customer trust
  • Responding uncovers product improvement and sales opportunities
  • Engagement creates happy customers and happy customers talk positively about you
  • Most brands make it hard to speak with someone – Engage and be a champion

Q3: How can a brand surprise and delight customers when providing social customer care?

  • The fact the brand actually engaged
  • Problems happen – brands that engage and solve them create and keep loyal customers
  • Reply within 1 hour – Show empathy – Admit fault in public – Confirm resolution and satisfaction
  • Do not use canned responses – make them personal and show you have actual people who care within your organization

Q4: What are some good ways to keep track of ongoing conversations with members of your community?

Q5: What are some creative ways to use Twitter boolean (advanced) search to find opportunities to engage?

  • Have not used it 😦 Love to hear more
  • Answer from @sprout_sarah – Here’s a comprehensive cheatsheet on Advanced Search for Twitter, SUPER helpful: Twitter Search

Q6: What are the best ways to keep track of trends while listening on social?

  • I use a board – makes it easy to classify and find ideas
  • Follow people and add them to lists – then you can add the list to a dashboard to easily monitor it

Please stop by the next #SproutChat and join the conversation.  I look forward to your comments and collaborating with you.

Cheers,

Toby

 

Your Utility Infielder & Company MVP

cmgr

I am often asked: “Under what department does a community belong?” As you see from my simple slide, the Community Manager supports and contributes throughout the company.

Social Media, Customer Service, Technical Support, Marketing, Product Development – these are essentials your community can deliver. Setting up a community and choosing the right platform is a different discussion, but before doing either, start with a qualified Community Manager.

Where does your community live?

Cheers,

Toby

 

My Workstyle – Lead & Inspire

Simon

I often get asked: “What makes you tick and how do you motivate others?”  These are my four principals; I would love to discuss them further with you.

Collaborate, Question, Understand

  • Ask: Is this the best way and why?
  • Remove silos & work towards a common goal
  • Understand goals, expectations & what equals success

Manage people not spreadsheets

  • Encourage and empower
  • Ensure my message is understood
  • Numbers are easy to manage, people are not
  • Metrics are guardrails that ensure you are on track

Be a customer advocate

  • Have a win-win outlook
  • Do not hide behind bad policy
  • Help them navigate your processes
  • Be their partner and make life easier

Engagement over membership

  • Rather than 100,000 members, achieve a 90% answer rate
  • 75% of content / answers are customer driven
  • Without engagement, you have a list, not a community

How do you manage, motivate, and keep your team on track?  I welcome your comments and questions.

Best,

Toby

The Community Manager – Part 1

be-nice

What does a community manager do?  What skills are required?  This is the first in a multi-part series written to answer those questions.  This post will discuss setting standards and having the right mindset.  Imagine Dalton not as a Cooler, but a Community Manager…

“Be Nice”
A Community Manager’s job is to build relationships, listen to and help community members, and steer discussions; all while staying positive.  It is important to set standards and be firm, but be nice.  Make your positive attitude contagious.

“Nobody ever wins a fight”
It can feel good to get the best of a troll, but there will always be another.  Never get caught up in the anger of someone who only seeks to throw bombs or attack others – delete the post, block the troll, and move on. Community members look to you to set the tone: if you are rude and attack others, they will too.

“I want you to remember that it’s a job. It’s nothing personal”
Never let a troll get the best of you by invading your head.  No matter the community, members will have opinions about the way do do a job or solve a problem: as the Community Manager, it is your responsibility to see that conversations stay on track and remain professional.  You brand or company is not a damsel in distress that needs to be saved; allowing objective disagreement builds credibility.  Stay on topic and NEVER let a discussion become an argument.

“People who really want to have a good time won’t come to slaughterhouse”
No matter your community: business / hobby, internal / external – members join to learn from one another, to share best practices, and help each other solve problems.  No one wants to read personal rants or get attacked for their opinions: a bad environment will not only hinder discussion, it WILL destroy your membership.

Be fair, Be firm, Be nice
I welcome your comments.
Cheers,
Toby

Honesty, Transparency, and Sunlight

Transparency

No matter if you are politician, business person, or social media pro, you (should) seek to gain trust and the loyalty it provides.  Trust.  So hard to earn and so easy to lose.

You reach a crossroad and you are not sure which path to take; do I need to defend my brand or organization?  When that time comes, ask yourself and those in the room: will this decision pass the “sunlight test?”  If what you are trying to hide reaches the sunlight, what will people think?  Why would you be hiding this in the first place?

You may need to break a tie or relationship, but you will be right with a clear conscience and respected reputation.

Your comments are welcome.

Best,

Toby

Don’t Be Afraid – Engage

Constructive

Social media is a funny thing: brands covet its reach, but often forget about engaging with those who provide valuable feedback.  Finding the right channel(s), social listening, and crafting the right outgoing messages are important, but without engagement, you will not be trusted; without trust, you will not succeed.  Let’s discuss keys to engagement and resolution.

Problem:

The customer reaches out via Tweet, Facebook, or a post within your community with a constructive, objective issue they have with your product or service.

Process:

  • The customer should receive a response within the hour
  • Apologize and show empathy
  • Research the customer’s history:
    • Products utilized
    • Their past issues
    • Is there already an open case for this issue?
  • If possible, answer the question at the initial contact; if an off-line chat is needed, offer the customer communication options:
    • Instant message
    • A link to a related discussion within your community
    • A private chat room within your community
    • A one on one phone call that may include a WebEx session
  • Engage, listen, understand:
    • Problem scope
    • Business impact
    • Pain points
    • Customer expectations
  • Offer solutions that are a win-win
  • Get customer buy-in to your solution and its timeline
  • Deliver results
  • Confirm customer satisfaction

Reminders:

  • Never take things personally or argue publicly with the customer
  • This may be an opportunity to improve your product or service
  • If this is a recurring issue, eliminating issue eliminates future cases
  • The customer may not be as familiar with the product line as you; he is frustrated and deserves your attention and help.
  • All companies and services encounter problems, the very best acknowledge them and respond creating brand advocates and loyal customers.

critics

Don’t fear complaints.  Engage with customers, take ownership, fix the issue, amaze them, and build advocates.

What are your engagement challenges or fears?

Best,

Toby

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t Just Inform, Learn

collaboration

You are under stress about customer service: resources are limited and you know that an engaged and educated customer will not only be a happy one, but will also better utilize your product.  Self-service is cost effective and fast: time for a knowledge base of articles your customers can access on their time to answer their questions.  Great in theory, BUT…

No matter how well the article is written, it may not completely answer the customer’s unique issue.   “Was this article helpful?” If the customer cannot ask a question he still has a problem and will be frustrated.  Frustrated customers seek other options that make their lives easier and that means lost contracts and revenues.  What can you do?  A knowledge base is great, but blogging is better.

Like a knowledge base article, a blog is customer-specific content that provides self-service.  Blogging is better because it not only allows customers to ask questions, but gives you the opportunity to engage and learn from them.  Answering their particular question through engagement satisfies, educates, and makes them feel heard; increasing their loyalty.  In addition, you may uncover ways to improve your product as well as opportunities to increase wallet share.

Don’t just inform, learn.

Your comments and questions are most welcomed!