Twitter Analytics – Know Your Audience

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When most consider Twitter analytics, they think of a custom campaign measured by utm codes and Google Analyitcs, but are you also utilizing Twitter’s built-in tools?  When was the last time you clicked the Analytics tab from the dropdown of your profile picture on the top right corner?  Hopefully this blog will introduce you to some Twitter-tools that will increase your reach and engagement.

Analytics opens with the Home tab to give you an idea of how your tweets are doing.  What are you Tweet impressions (the number of times your tweets have been seen), what was your Top Tweet, are you getting mentioned by others, and who is your Top Mention.  Keep track of this data month to month and ensure you are reaching out to your Top Mentions.

Capture

After Home, I click the Tweets tab: are people really seeing my tweets, are they clicking on hyperlinks, and are they taking actions: retweets, likes, and replies.  This tab provides  insight to reach and most importantly engagement.

Activity

Next is the Audiences tab: there is so much good stuff here, explore and see what is important to you and your brand.  This data can be toggled by audience: All Twitter Users, Your Followers, or Your Organic Audience.  Once you have chosen the audience, dig into the data types.

Twitter

 

Take the time to review all this great data and learn who you are tweeting to, what they like consuming, and what tweets encourage their engagement.

I look forward to your questions and comments.

Cheers,

Toby

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#Bufferchat: Social Media Analytics

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My recap of the 3/15/2017 #Bufferchat hosted by @buffer and @RivallQ.  Join the conversation every Wednesday at 12pm EST.

Let’s kick off with an icebreaker! If you’d like, share where you’re tweeting from… & where you wish you were tweeting from!

Icebreaker: Tweeting from Needham MA – I am the – would love to visit Australia (it’s summer there now)

Q1: Why track and measure social media analytics?

  • You cannot improve what you are not measuring
  • Analytics help you report the success of your efforts up the management chain
  • Analytics help you identify the content your customers love (and my not like so much)

Q2: If you could only pick one social media metric to capture, what would it be and why?

  • The ideal metric will depend on the Social Tool you are using
  • For Twitter: time on site – shows you directed them to content they like
  • For my community: questions asked – As this number increases, it shows my community is trusted by my customers
  • No matter a Social Media campaign or a Tweetchat – engagement is the Key

Q3: What tools work well for capturing analytics across your social media platforms?

Q4: How often do you (or should you) analyze your social media data?

  • Monthly, Quarterly, Annually
  • It can depend on the campaign: email, social, blogging, etc
  • Remember to compare year over year – how did you move the needle?

Q5: Have you ever made a big shift in your social media strategy because of analyzing data?

  • Have not made a major shift – thankfully small tweaks have made the difference
  • Always testing hashtags and content types

Q6: Where are the best resources for better understanding social media analytics?

  • tweetchats (like this one)
  • I would like to learn the best resources, but there are some easily sourced content via Google search
  • I network with other Community Managers – we trade best practices

Q7: If you could wave a magic wand and have any analytics feature you wanted, what would it be?

  • I would wish for the one perfect tool: easy to use, digs deep into the network, creates solid dashboards

Thanks for reading – I look forward to you comments and hope to see you at the next #bufferchat.

Cheers,

Toby

The Community Manager – Metrics

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This is the third installment in my Community Manager series.  I believe in managing people over spreadsheets, but without defined measurements, you will not know if you are on the way to meeting your goals or what corrections to make.  In this blog, I will discuss setting and measuring goals for your community as well as Twitter.

Size vs Collaboration:

It happens all the time, no matter a community or Twitter account, too much attention is given to membership size rather than engagement.  You may have a community of 200k; if they are not asking and answering each other’s questions, you have a group of individuals, NOT a community.  The same goes for Twitter Followers: without engagement, you have the modern equivalent of a failed email distribution list.

Active Users:

How many of your members are active each month or quarter? Active users are those who are participating: they have logged in, asked a question, contributed to a discussion, liked a comment or discussion topic, or provided an answer or or marked an answer correct.

Answer Rate vs Engagement Rate:

As you build your community, you will be generating the majority of the content as well as providing the answers.  As your community matures the content flow will shift: members will not only start discussions, but will also answer questions.  For each month and quarter, how many questions have answers that have been marked correct?  For each question asked, how many get a response; not just answers, but clarifying questions?  Engagement rate is more important than correct answer rate: answers may not always be marked as correct by the original poster, but you want to ensure when a question is asked, a response has been provided.

Measuring Engagement – Twitter

  1. Likes and Like-Ratio
  2. ReTweets
  3. Replies
  4. Lists

Social Promotion

Successful tweeting is more than casting a wide net via multiple tweets.  What are the best times of day to tweet, how many times week should I tweet?  Google Analytics and UTM codes can help you.  These four are indicators of both traffic and engagement:

  1. Sessions
  2. New Users
  3. Pages / Session
  4. Ave. Session Duration

How are you measuring your community?  What tools do you use?  Thanks for commenting.

Cheers,

Toby