Twitter Analytics – Know Your Audience

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When most consider Twitter analytics, they think of a custom campaign measured by utm codes and Google Analyitcs, but are you also utilizing Twitter’s built-in tools?  When was the last time you clicked the Analytics tab from the dropdown of your profile picture on the top right corner?  Hopefully this blog will introduce you to some Twitter-tools that will increase your reach and engagement.

Analytics opens with the Home tab to give you an idea of how your tweets are doing.  What are you Tweet impressions (the number of times your tweets have been seen), what was your Top Tweet, are you getting mentioned by others, and who is your Top Mention.  Keep track of this data month to month and ensure you are reaching out to your Top Mentions.

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After Home, I click the Tweets tab: are people really seeing my tweets, are they clicking on hyperlinks, and are they taking actions: retweets, likes, and replies.  This tab provides  insight to reach and most importantly engagement.

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Next is the Audiences tab: there is so much good stuff here, explore and see what is important to you and your brand.  This data can be toggled by audience: All Twitter Users, Your Followers, or Your Organic Audience.  Once you have chosen the audience, dig into the data types.

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Take the time to review all this great data and learn who you are tweeting to, what they like consuming, and what tweets encourage their engagement.

I look forward to your questions and comments.

Cheers,

Toby

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Is Social Media Automation All Bad?

twittersmarter

My recap and answers I provided for the 10/26/2017 #TwitterSmarter chat hosted by @MadalynSklar and guest @AgoraPulse.  Join the conversation every Thursday at 1pm EST.  Automation may be a time saver, but it is NOT engagement and may actually hurt you.

Q1: Can you really put your Twitter profile on “auto-pilot” with automation tools?

  • You can put your account on auto-pilot, but I do not recommend it
  • Going on auto-pilot removes true conversation with fellow tweeters
  • Auto-pilot could hurt credibility and make you appear to be a bot
  • I schedule tweets, but ALWAYS engage myself

Q2: What types of content or updates can be shared via automation tools?

  • I schedule blog posts
  • I tried to auto-pilot my tweetchat answers, but it did not work out well 🙂

Q3: How often do you repeat content on Twitter? Do you get good results?

  • I post blogs on multiple times and day when I write them
  • I believe it is ok to reuse content, but I try not to over-post the same thing

Q4: Where do businesses or brands often fail when it comes to automating their social media channels?

  • Brands fail when they use canned, generic responses
  • Brands fail when they over schedule and post too much all at once
  • Brand fail when they don’t measure the popularity of their content and keep posting things ppl don’t like or value
  • There is NOTHING worse than an auto-DM with a link to a blog or sales pitch

Q5: What automation tools can help you share content in a relevant, meaningful way?

  • I use @hootsuite to schedule and share my blog
  • I use @tweetchat to follow and participate in tweetchats

Q6: What are your top tips for using automation to increase your traffic and reach?

  • Follow what Google Analytics tell you: best time to post, the content your audience likes – repeat
  • I do utilize an automated welcome email in my community when someone registers – it contains how-to’s & tips

Q7: Are you sick and tired of auto-DMs or do you think they’re a great tool to get more leads?

  • I only DMs ppl I know
  • Canned Auto-DMs are the worst
  • Don’t believe Auto-DMs will yield qualified engagement or leads
  • DMs are good for customer service: private, documented, and allow longer character length

Q8: What is your best advice to find balance between automation and real-time engagement?

  • Automate your scheduling – engage in person

Thank you for reading and hope to see you at the next #twittersmarter chat.  I look forward to your questions and comments.

Cheers,

Toby

 

#SproutChat: Manage & Amplify Social Media Content

Sproutchat

Good day community managers and social pros, this is my recap and answers I provided for the 10/25/2017 #SproutChat hosted by Rachael Samuels @RachaelSamuels  Join the conversation every Wednesday at 3pm EST.

Q1: What are some best practices for managing multimedia content for social media?

  • Ensure the content is sized and formatted to match each social media outlet
  • Build a library of content used
  • Use the right platform to reach the right audience
  • ALWAYS give credit to the content’s creator if it is not you or your firm

Q2: How do you manage visual content when you’re at a live event with a team? Or on the go?

  • Smartphone
  • Livestream
  • If I am going to attend a show, I let my audience know prior and what hashtag to follow
  • LiveTweet with pictures of yourself (and customers or fellow employees)
  • Ensure you enable geolocation and tag your location when on the go

Q3: What are ways that you can ensure that there isn’t crossover in posting if multiple people have access?

  • Have a plan with responsibilities
  • A social calendar keeps everyone organized: who does what, when
  • Scheduling posts through one dashboard gives visibility and helps prevent duplication

Q4: How do you organize or tag multimedia content for easy lookup?

  • Use the same hashtag as the event it covers
  • Hootsuite allows you to create a content library and you can catalog it there
  • Ensure the tag for the content matches utm code so you can easily track its success via Google Analytics

Q5: Share some best practices for sharing repurposed content for brands.

  • Ensure the content is important to your audience; not just you
  • Ensure the content tells a story

Q6: How do you amplify content among employees or advocates?

  • LinkedIn Elevate is a great way to share content internally
  • Feature customer created community content in Twitter feeds
  • I always let the employee or customers know I am going to feature them
  • Ask employees or customers to lead a discussion in your community
  • Ask employees or customers for content they would like to see on your Instagram
  • Feature customer Tweets or Instagram posts on your account

If you work in social media, #SproutChat is a must attend.  I hope to see you there and welcome your comments.

Cheers,

Toby

 

#Bufferchat: Day In The Life (Of A Social Media Manager)

Bufferchat

My recap of the 9/27/2017 #Bufferchat hosted by @buffer.  Join the conversation every Wednesday at 12pm EST.

Q1: What is the first thing you do when you get started with work for the day?

  • Job 1 is to check mentions / direct messages in my community & on Twitter
  • I purposely do not start with email at that can often be a black hole
  • I check into my board to see what projects are pressing

Q2: What are your main areas of focus in your work as a social media manager?

  • Curate content for social platforms – rather than thought leadership, I seek customer-centric
  • Find content that Account Managers and Sales ppl can use to best engage customers
  • Share content that educates and interests my customers
  • How can I educate and help people in a way that starts conversations – it’s not called “social” media for nothing

Q3: How do you organize/structure your work day with tasks/projects?

  • To stay on track, I use Outlook reminders and boards to organize tasks and projects
  • Schedule my tweets and blog posts with and

Q4: Approximately how long do you spend directly on social media platforms throughout your work day?

  • When I am scheduling tweets and blogs, that is the most time, but about 2 hours a day is normal
  • I always respond to direct messages and mentions – customers expect (and deserve) acknowledgement
  • Ensure you have a social dashboard – it will make content easy to digest

Q5: As a social media manager, do you collaborate with a team or mainly work autonomously? Which do you prefer?

  • I collaborate with a team to triage questions that arrive via social
  • I curate content a place it into a social library for the team to use
  • For the most part, I work alone, but find, create, and share content to help others

Q6: Which part of your work do you enjoy the most, and why?

  • Conversations, conversations, conversations
  • It is fantastic to sit back and watch community members help one another
  • If I get a like, comment, or questions on content I have created – I am rewarded.
  • When I check Google Analytics as see that ppl are not only clicking my links, but spending time on site too
  • Tweetchats are not only important parts, but very rewarding

Q7: If you had more hours in the day to focus on new skills or projects for your social media work, what would you focus on?

  • I would like to improve my HTML chops
  • More webinars, classes, and learning in general – maybe start a podcast
  • Develop the perfect analytics platform

Thanks again @buffer – see everyone next week!  If you have questions about online communities, I am always happy to chat.

Cheers,

Toby

Before The Wheels Come Off The Wagon

o-COMPLAINING-facebook

Your company has an online community and utilizes social media – GREAT!  Listening to and engaging with your customers is always a great idea, but this blog is not about social benefits; I am going to discuss planning for the inevitable problem.

No matter your product or service, there is no way to avoid problems and the public complaints that follow: mistakes will be made and customers will get upset.  They will turn to Twitter, Facebook, or your Community to let you (and the public) know about their pain.  How are you going to triage and manage these complaints and keep drips from becoming a flood?  Have a plan.

Each firm has different staffing levels and available resources; this chart is a guide to help you formulate your triage plan.  No plan is perfect, nor will it prevent issues; however great companies do not hide from trouble, they take ownership and tackle it.

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Don’t let your fear of public complaints keep you from utilizing social media or creating a community.  Have a plan and the thick skin to deal with it – your customers will reward you for it.

I welcome your questions and comments.

Best,

Toby

Community Manager ROI: Customer Retention

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I have to take my hat off to Andrew Dennis (@AndrewDennis33) for this excellent piece on the importance of customer retention.  Andrew shows why it is important to retain customers, I am going to discuss who can help you make it happen.

Think about your online community and all the customers who visit and participate daily. These folks are not only paying your bills, they are potential brand ambassadors and peer to peer customer service reps.  Your Community Manager engages this valuable group daily, is their advocate, will triage their issues, and gains their trust.

When it comes to ROI, a strong community will:

  1. Provide peer to peer support: customers will answer each other’s questions and share tips.
  2. Develop a knowledge base from conversations and answers provided within the community into a two-sided knowledge base for customer self-learning.
    • Internal: what the product was designed to do
    • From Customers: what the product CAN do
  3. Provide trusted product reviews for potential customers.
  4. A reduction of formal cases filed with your Support or Engineering teams.
  5. A treasure trove of customer-centric content for your social media efforts.

Thank you Andrew for clearly communicating the importance of retention, now we must work with our Community Manager(s) to make it happen.  I look forward to your comments and questions.

Best,

Toby

 

Run Your Business Like a Rock Band

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Good day everyone, I wrote this some time ago, but some lessons need to be remembered.  This piece was inspired by an article from “The Boston Globe:”

What businesses can learn from the Grateful Dead

The Grateful Dead provided us with more than memorable summer nights; they showed the way to business success. I will focus on two ideas and how they relate to Community Management and Customer Service.

1. Be Transparent
“The Grateful Dead’s authenticity endeared them to fans and allowed the band to experiment. They found that mistakes are quickly forgiven if a company is transparent about what it’s doing.”

Trust is everything in business and your business will disappear if your customers do not trust you. Come forward and admit to your mistake, apologize and fix the problem or policy. Problems happen, the very companies do not sit back and hope the problem goes away, they take action to fix the issue AND admit they made a mistake.
Transparency is not just about customer service, it relates to your financial accounting too. Enron (and others), lost customer trust and fortunes because of greed and terrible ethics. Don’t keep two sets of books.
Great service and sound ethics are foundations on which you should build your company.

2. Give, and you shall Receive 
“The Grateful Dead removed barriers to their music by allowing fans to tape concerts for free. That brought in new fans and grew sales for concerts, records, and merchandise. They showed that when content is free, more people hear about a company and eventually do business with it.”

Customers are demanding access to knowledge in order to self-solve their problems. Providing an open knowledge base lowers your customer service costs, increases customer satisfaction, and shows your company is a thought leader. The Consortium for Service Innovation has published a paper about how Mathworks has turned knowledge-share upside down by publishing their entire knowledge base within their Community.
I can hear the question now: “But support contracts are a large part of our revenue, we can’t just give away our knowledge.”
Give away the knowledge, not the support. Customers who pay for a service contract are NOT paying for information, they are paying for immediate support and people to solve their problems for them.
Stop funneling your customers into horrible phone queues: listen to them on social media and build them a community where they can interact with you (and other customers) to learn, share knowledge, and solve their problems.

Rock on!

Cheers,
Toby